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The Generali Foundation has brought out a considerable number of publications, including several sizable standard works. The emphasis lies not so much on documenting the Foundation's own activities as on the production of significant, high-quality books on contemporary art, intended chiefly for a specialist audience.
 

Our publications, along with posters and postcards showing works from the collection, can be purchased at Generali Foundation. You will also find detailed information on all our publications there.

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Brigitte Fortner
Shopmanager Museum der Moderne Salzburg
Phone +43 662 84 22 20-401
shop@remove-this.mdmsalzburg.at

Edward Krasinski. Les mises en scène

"Edward Krasinski. Les mises en scène"
Sabine Breitwieser (ed.) for the Generali Foundation, Vienna 2006.

Preface by Dietrich Karner, introduction by Sabine Breitwieser, texts by Pawel Polit, Adam Szymcyk, Interviews with Edward Krasinski and Anka Ptaszkowska.

Germ./Engl., 352 pages, 70 color and 230 black-and-white illustrations, softcover
Article n. 3-901107-49-5
EUR 34,90
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  • Description

    • Edward Krasinski (1925 Luck —2004 Warsaw) is one of the most important protagonists of the progressive Polish art scene of the 1960s and 1970s. His work drew on the avant-garde heritage of Constructivism and Surrealism in Poland, and is fully documented here for the first time with around 300 historical illustrations. This book includes numerous photographs by Eustachy Kossakowski and Tadeusz Rolke, who followed Krasinski’s work for more than forty years. The focus is on Krasinski’s unique exhibition designs, which always went beyond the presentation of individual works. Exhibitions became extraordinary spaces into which he integrated his works. Thus he provided ever new perspectives on his art which oscillates between painting, sculpture, and installation. Krasinski turned his studio, for example, which he had taken over from the Constructivist Henryk Stazewski, into an environment that then became a theme in new works. His longrunning “game” with the blue “line” is well known. The blue “line” could be represented by a tapering down of his sculptural objects, by a telex at the Tokyo Biennale in 1970, or by a strip of Scotch tape. This blue tape became Krasinski’s chosen means of defining spaces.